2. Donor Influence In Hiring

A. Interference in Early Hiring

The Charles Koch Foundation's influence can be found at all stages of their academic programming, in particular, the hiring process. Documentation from just a few of the hundreds of schools receiving Koch foundation funding provides an increasingly detailed picture of how the Koch foundation predetermines the hiring process.

Several ways that the Koch foundation has acquired early influence have included insisting on pre-screening job candidates at Florida State, to the use of a political talent agency, TalentMarket.org, to recruit for university hiring at Wake Forest.

EXAMPLES

 

At Florida State University, the “Affiliated Programs and Positions” established by CKF are required to comply with the following:

1. Objectives and Purposes. (a) The purpose of the Affiliated Programs and Positions is to advance the understanding and practice of those free voluntary processes and principles that promote social progress, human well-being, individual freedom, opportunity and prosperity based on the rule of law, constitutional government, private property and the laws, regulations, organizations, institutions and social norms upon which they rely, These goals will be pursued by supplementing the academic talent that is currently at FSU to create a strong program that will focus on building upon and expanding research and teaching efforts related to economic institutions and political economy. (2008 and 2013 FSU MOU)

All aspects of the programs set forward in the MOU are obligated to comply with the Koch Foundation’s “Objectives and Purposes,”  and compliance is actively enforced by CKF, which:

...reserves the right to discontinue or revoke any part of this Memorandum (including withholding any amounts to be made under any Donor Agreement to which CKF is a party regarding the Affiliated Programs and Positions) [...] if in CKF's reasonable discretion, such action is necessary to protect the Objectives and Purposes set forth in Section I(a) above. (2008 and 2013 FSU MOU, Section 12, pg 9)

A supplemental document to FSU’s 2008 MOU, Attachment C, reveals Koch’s ability to withdraw funding for noncompliance at any point with 15 days notice;

Such termination shall be deemed effective upon the expiration of said fifteen (15) days from the date notice was provided by Donor to Donee and University, if Donee and/or University have not therefore corrected the events of default or performed the acts described in the notice.” (FSU 2008 MOU Attachment C, Section V.H)

 

At Utah State University, the 2008 MOU creates donor funded positions by “augmenting funding for five professors,” called “the Professors”: 

1. Objectives and Purposes.
(a) The purpose of the support for the Professors is to advance the understanding and practice of those free voluntary processes and principles that promote social progress, human well-being, individual freedom, opportunity and prosperity based on the rule of law, constitutional government, private property and the laws, regulations, organizations, institutions and social norms upon which they rely. These goals will be pursued by supplementing the academic talent currently at USU to create a strong program that will focus on  building upon and expanding research and teaching efforts related to individual freedom, social progress and human well-being. The Parties seek to strengthen the foundation that exists at USU and extend efforts related to the research, publication, education, dissemination and academic and public appreciation of individual freedom, social progress and human well-being (Collectively, the “Objectives and Purposes”). (USU 2008 MOU, Section 1.a)

All activities of “the Professors” set forward in the MOU are obligated to comply with the Koch Foundation’s “Objectives and Purposes,”  and compliance is actively enforced by CKF, which:

 CGK Foundation reserves the right to discontinue or withhold any Funding Amount to be paid under this Agreement if, in CGK Foundation’s reasonable discretion, (a) USU has not fully complied with the terms and conditions of this Agreement; (b) the Professors are not advancing the Purposes and Objectives; or (c) such action is necessary to comply with any law or regulation applicable to USU or to CGK Foundation. (USU 2008 MOU, Section 9)

The monitoring of compliance not only an obligation that university hires and officials are responsible for, but the Koch foundation also requires access to faculty “files” and “accounts” on any given business day: 

Additionally, USU will cause CGK Foundation and its representatives to have reasonable access during regular business hours to files, reports, accounts, or personnel that are associated with this Agreement, the Professors and the Funding Amount.  (USU 2008 MOU, Section 10.a)

 

At Clemson University, the 2009 MOU is distinct from some other MOUs, in that it references a  that “[t]he University, within its College of Business and Behavioral Science, has established CISC,” the Clemson Institute for the Study of Capitalism. In addition to requiring that the “Donor Supported Faculty Positions” comply with the Objectives and Purposes, the agreement suggests that Koch’s Objectives and Purposes were already the primary objectives of CISC:

I. Objectives and Purposes
(a) The University, within its College of Business and Behavioral Science, has established CISC. The primary objectives and purposes of CISC are to advance the understanding and practice of those free and voluntary processes and principles that promote social progress, human well-being, individual freedom, opportunity and prosperity based on the rule of law, constitutional government, private property and the laws, regulations, organizations, institutions and social norms upon which they rely. It is the Parties’ intention that the objectives and purposes of CISC will be further advanced by CGK Foundation’s provisioning of funds to recruit and hire positions (hereinafter referred to as the “Donor Supported Faculty Positions") at CISC to help strengthen this foundation and extend efforts related to research, publication, dissemination, teaching, and continued academic and public use of the and support the research into the causes, measurements, impact, and appreciation of economic freedom. (Clemson 2008 MOU, Section I.a )

All aspects of the programs set forward in the MOU are obligated to comply with the Koch Foundation’s “Objectives and Purposes,”  and compliance is actively enforced. The Koch foundation:

reserves the right to discontinue or withhold any amount offending to be made under this Agreement if, in CGK Foundation’s reasonable discretion, University has not fully complied with the terms and conditions of this Agreement; the Donor Supported Faculty Positions are not advancing the Purposes and Objectives set forth in Section I above
[...]
The parties acknowledge that the funding commitment made by CGK Foundation under this Agreement is subject to the satisfaction of the terms and agreements set forth in this agreement and that a breach by University of any commitment, agreement, obligation, covenant, representation or warranty, made or required under this Agreement shall give CGK Foundation the ability to terminate this Agreement. (Clemson 2008 MOU, Sections VI.B and VI.I, pages 5 and 6)

The Koch foundation reserves the right to give only 15 days notice before withdrawing all funds

Such termination shall be deemed effective upon the expiration of said fifteen (15) days from the date notice was provided by CGK Foundation to University, if University has not therefore corrected the events of default or performed the acts described in the notice. During the pendency of this 15-day period, CGK Foundation will not be obligated to contribute any funds pursuant to this Agreement and University will suspend any further payments pending the corrective action by the University. In the event of termination of this Agreement, notwithstanding any contrary provision herein, CGK Foundation shall have the right to require that all unexpended Contributed Amounts be returned to CGK Foundation. (Clemson 2008 MOU, Section VI.I)

 

At West Virginia University, the “Donor Supported Professorship Positions” established by CKF are required to comply with the following Objectives and Purposes:

1. Objectives and Purposes
(a) The University and its Department of Economics, within the College of Business and Economics (“College”), have established a focused research effort among select faculty members with the purpose of advancing the philosophical and interdisciplinary understanding of human freedom in the political, economic, social and personal domains and to explore the nature of free market economics and its impact on our society (hereinafter referred to as the “Program”). The Parties desire to further support the Program’s mission by supplementing the academic talent (hereinafter referred to as the “Donor Supported Professorship Positions”) currently within the University and the Department of Economics to create a strong program that will focus on building upon and expanding the research and teaching efforts related to the University and the Program as described herein. (WVU 2009 MOU, Section 1.a)

All aspects of the programs set forward in the MOU are obligated to comply with the Koch Foundation’s “Objectives and Purposes,” and compliance is actively enforced. The Koch foundation:

... reserves the right to discontinue or withhold any amount to be contributed under this Agreement if in CGK Foundation's reasonable discretion (a) the University or the Donee have not fully complied with the terms and conditions of this Agreement; (b) the College, Donor Supported Professorship Positions, and College's operations are not advancing the Purposes and Objectives set forth in Section 1(a) above
[...]
...a breach, whether caused by Donee or University, of any commitment, agreement, obligation, covenant, representation or warranty, made or required under this Agreement shall give CGK Foundation the ability to terminate this Agreement. (WVU 2009 MOU, Section VI.J and VI.H)

The Koch foundation is able to withhold funding after providing just 15 days notice:

Such termination shall be deemed effective upon the expiration of said fifteen (15) business days from the date notice was provided by CGK Foundation to Donee and/or University, if Donee and/or University have not therefore corrected the events of default or performed the acts described in the notice. During the pendency of this 15-day period, CGK Foundation will not be obligated to contribute any funds pursuant to this Agreement and Donee will suspend any further payments pending the corrective action by the Donee and/or University. In the event of termination of this Agreement, notwithstanding any contrary provision herein, CGK Foundation shall have the right to require that all unexpended Contribution Amounts contributed be returned to CGK Foundation. (WVU 2009 MOU, Section VI.H)

 

At the University of Louisville, a 2015 MOU creates the John H. Schnatter Center for Free Enterprise in a partner donorship with John Schnatter (CEO of Papa John’s). Unlike many past agreements, where all programs and hiring must comply with a centrally defined “Objectives and Purposes,” the "Center's Mission" and “Objectives” are stipulated a supplementary document:

The mission of the Center is to engage in research and teaching that explores the role of enterprise and entrepreneurship in advancing human well-being (the "Center's Mission").

The Center’s staff and activities are required to “support the Center’s Missions.” In fact, the MOU states unambiguously that “the Donor agrees to contribute funds to the Foundation exclusively to support the Center Programs to advance the Center's Mission” (UL 2015 MOU, Section 4.a).

The MOU further clarifies that compliance is determined by the sole and “reasonable discretion” of the Donor, who retains the ability to withhold funding at anytime, and revoke the agreement altogether:

The Donor has the right to terminate this Agreement and discontinue or withhold any Contributed Amount. . . If at any point during the Term, the Donor determines in its reasonable discretion that: (i) the Foundation or the University has not acted in good faith under this Agreement; (ii) the Center Programs are not advancing the Center's Mission as stated in this Agreement, . . . the Donor shall notify the Foundation and the University of its determination, and the Parties shall make a good faith effort to meet within sixty (60) days to discuss the Donor's determination. If the Donor's determination does not change after the end of this sixty (60) day period, the Donor has the right to terminate the Agreement upon providing thirty (30) days' notice to the Foundation and the University. During the pendency of the sixty (60) day period and any following thirty (30) day notice period, the Donor shall not be obligated to provide any Contributed Amount. In the event of termination of the Agreement, the Foundation and the University each agree to return all uncommitted Contributed Amounts to the Donor within fifteen (15) days of the Donor's request. (UL 2015 MOU, Section 8.a)

 

At the University of Kentucky, a 2015 MOU created the John H. Schnatter Institute for the Study of Free Enterprise with partner donor John Schnatter (CEO of Papa John’s). Much like the University of Louisville, the "Institute's Mission" replaces Koch's “Objectives and Purposes.”

In this instance, the agreement's preamble asserts that "has for at least (10) years engaged in academic programming, teaching, research and support for faculty and graduate students within the Gatton College for the study of free enterprise" and the "Parties desire to expand those existing activities." 

The agreement stipulates Dr. John Garen to be the director of the Institute, and ten years prior to this agreement, in 2005, Garen became chair of the UK's economics department. According to his CV, he began coordinating the BB&T Program for the Study of Capitalism in 2007. 

Attachment A attributes the Institute's "Mission" to the University:

The Gatton College of Business and Economics will house the newly created John H. Schnatter Institute for the Study of Free Enterprise (the "Institute"). The Institute enables the Gatton College to continue and expand its longstanding mission to discover and understand aspects of free enterprise that promote the well being of society (UK 2015 MOU, Attachment A)

The agreement then carefully states:

the University has informed the Donor, and the Donor is relying on such representation, that the Institute's mission is to discover and understand aspects of free enterprise that promote the well-being of society (the "Institute's Mission") (UK 2015 MOU, Section 2.a).

The MOU further clarifies that compliance with the "Institute's Mission" is determined by the sole and “reasonable discretion” of the Donor, who retains the ability to withhold funding at anytime, and revoke the agreement altogether:

The Donor has the right to terminate this Agreement and discontinue or withhold any Contributed Amount. . . .If at any point during the Term, the Donor determines in its reasonable discretion that: (i) the Foundation or the University has not acted in good faith under this Agreement; (ii) the Center Programs are not advancing the Center's Mission as stated in this Agreement, . . . the Donor shall notify the Foundation and the University of its determination, and the Parties shall make a good faith effort to meet within sixty (60) days to discuss the Donor's determination. If the Donor's determination does not change after the end of this sixty (60) day period, the Donor has the right to terminate the Agreement upon providing thirty (30) days' notice to the Foundation and the University. During the pendency of the sixty (60) day period and any following thirty (30) day notice period, the Donor shall not be obligated to provide any Contributed Amount. In the event of termination of the Agreement, the Foundation and the University each agree to return all uncommitted Contributed Amounts to the Donor within fifteen (15) days of the Donor's request. (UK 2015 MOU, Section 8.a)

 

At Ball State University, the Charles Koch Foundation and the John H. Schnatter Family Foundation are donor partners in the creation of the John H. Schnatter Institute for Entrepreneurship and Free Enterprise. The 2016 Grant Agreement  very cautiously establishes the “Institute’s Mission” as:

the University has informed the Donor, and the Donor is relying on such representation, that the Institute's mission is to become a national model for values- and ethics-based entrepreneurship, developing research and talent to help solve contemporary problems and promote understanding of the characteristics and virtues of free enterprise in helping people improve their lives (the "Institute's Mission") (BSU Agreement, Sec. 2.a)  

Broadly, the agreement gives Koch and Schnatter the “sole and absolute discretion” to withdraw their funding for any part of the Institute Programs, at any time:

The Donor has the right to terminate this Agreement or decline to provide any Contributed Amount in response to a Foundation Grant Report if, in its sole and absolute discretion: (i) the Foundation or the University has materially breached this Agreement; (ii) the Institute Programs are not advancing the Institute's Mission as stated in this Agreement; or (iii) such action is necessary to comply with any law applicable to the Foundation, the University, or the Donor. Such termination or decision not to provide any Contributed Amount in response to a Foundation Grant Report shall be deemed effective upon the expiration of thirty (30) days from the date notice was provided by the Donor to the Foundation or the University. In the event the Donor terminates the Agreement, the Foundation and the University each agree to return all uncommitted Contributed Amounts to the Donor within fifteen (15) days of the Donor's request. (BSU Grant Agreement, 8.a)

 

At George Mason University, a 2016 MOU accompanied a $30 million donation that not only renamed the law school after Antonin Scalia. The Koch foundation contributed $10 million along side $20 million from an anonymous donor.

The compliance established by older Koch contracts through their "Objectives and Purposes" is instead split into two separate provisions.

Section 1 is a provision where Koch's coded language is proposed as a shared definition of "Academic Freedom" that is to be honored by all parties of the contract: 

Promoting Academic Freedom. Consistent with the Donor’s principles of supporting a diversity of ideas in higher education, the Donor’s grant is intended to help promote a republic of science at the University and the School, where ideas can be exchanged freely and useful knowledge will benefit the well-being of individuals and society. Thus, the Parties agree that the academic freedom of the University, the School, and their faculty, students, and staff is critical to the success of the School’s research, scholarship, teaching, and service; (GMU 2016 MOU, Section 1)

Much like the other contracts created after 2015, a pre-stated "Mission" replaces Koch's “Objectives and Purposes.” In this case, the "School's Mission" includes the strategic mission of George Mason University's School of Law, as well as several donor specific goals: 

to become a national leader in legal education by applying tools of economics and other social sciences to the study of legal doctrine, process, and institutions . . To accomplish its goals, the Law School intends to;
  • Retain focus on the study of Law & Economics, which is a recognizable and recognized brand and which furnishes the faculty with a common culture and frame of reference in which to structure the School’s priorities.
  • Develop additional related areas of concentration and intellectual leadership such as intellectual property, legal history, constitutional studies, administrative law, and the relationship between law and liberty. (GMU 2016 MOU, Attachment A) 

(Toward these goals, the donation stipulated the creation of two new centers within the GMU School of Law; the Center for the Study of the Administrative Slate and the Center for Liberty & Law.)

The agreement carefully states:

the University has in formed the Donor, and the Donor is retying on such representation, that the School’s mission is to become a national leader in legal education by applying tools of economics and other social sciences to the study of legal doctrine, process, and institutions (the “School’s Mission”). (GMU 2016 MOU, Section 2.a)

Yet it is the ultimately donor's sole and “reasonable discretion” that determine's the program's compliance with the "Support for the School" is determined by , who retains the “sole and absolute discretion” to withdraw their funding for any part of the Institute Programs, at any time:

The Donor has the right in its sole and absolute discretion to terminate this Agreement or discontinue or withhold any Contributed Amount if: (i) the Foundation or the University has not fully complied with any provision set forth in this Agreement; (ii) the Foundation of the University are not providing the School Support as stated in the Proposal, or (iii) such action is necessary to comply with any law applicable to the Foundation, the University, or the Donor. Such termination shall be deemed effective upon the expiration of thirty (30) days from the date notice was provided by the Donor to the Foundation or the University. In the event of termination of the Agreement, the Foundation and the University each agree to return all unexpended Contributed Amounts to the Donor within fifteen (15) days of the Donor's request. (GMU Grant Agreement, 7.a)

This language is line for line identical to what the Koch foundation uses for the creation of a center at Ball State University, swapping “Institute” for “School” and the italicized selection replaced with a synopsis of the “Institute’s Mission” (BSU 2016 Agreement, Sec. 2.a).

At Florida State University, a faculty senate investigation “determined that the Koch Memorandum of Understanding as currently written allows undue, outside influence over FSU’s academic content and processes.” Their report revealed extensive interference with the early hiring process, finding:

Koch prior approval of the advertisement used for filling positions, and Koch establishment of parallel interview activities at the professional conference where the FSU search committee was interviewing applicants. (Standley Report, 3.a)

They describe in further detail how Koch officials overstepped the expressed will of FSU Department of Economics:

At the annual meeting of the American Economic Association in January of 2009 in San Francisco, [Koch] donor officers requested personal participation in the interview sessions, which the department appropriately refused. But then members of the departmental interview team learned by coincidence that a donor representative was nevertheless making independent contact with candidates at the convention for lunch or similar informal conversations, without notifying the FSU interview team. (Walker Report, footnote to 3.c)

At Auburn University, an investigation in 2007 revealed that the hires made by the $300,000 donation by the Koch foundation involved a number of “irregularities.” One irregularity was the near absence of a job announcement, as reported by the Auburn Villager:

When they learned of the center, some faculty members asked if a national search had taken place and started looking for the job announcement. The job was not advertised on the AU Web site or on any of the recognized venues where economics faculty are usually recruited, they say”.

One professor said he finally found the job advertised only once on a Web site called Social Science Research Network. The advertisement was posted Nov. 4, 2007, with enquiries to go to [Dean] Jahera. Review of applications was to take place Dec. 1, 2007. On Nov. 9, however, [Robert] Lawson was already going to be on campus to give a seminar, according to an e-mail to a College of Business faculty member on Nov. 5, one day after the job was advertised. (Auburn Villager, Sept 2008)

In light of this, it does not seem likely or possible that there was a search committee mandated by Auburn’s own policies:

According to a faculty recruitment checklist posted online by AU's Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Employment Opportunity, a search committee is mandatory. The search committee reviews the advertisement and sets a timetable to review applications. The search committee then screens applications on the basis of advertised criteria, requests letters of reference and prepares a short list of candidates to be interviewed. Then candidates are interviewed and a candidate is selected.
[...]
After learning of the center in December and finding out that many senior faculty did not even know about the project in January, [AU President Jay] Gogue purportedly urged more openness. On Feb. 12, the center was included on the agenda for that month's University Senate meeting.
[...]
By that time, however, Lawson had already been hired and the center was a fait accompli. He is now an associate professor in the department of finance. (Auburn Villager, Sept 2008)

At Clemson University, the 2009 Memorandum of Understanding provides the Koch foundation oversight over the hiring process “Donor Supported Faculty Positions.” As the basis for selecting an initial pool of candidates, the university is obligated to ensure that potential hires adhere to Koch’s Objectives and Purposes:

(b) University agrees to recruit individuals for these two Donor Supported Faculty Positions who
(i) support the Objectives and Purposes set forth in Section 1(a) above,
(ii) demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively and effectively toward those Objectives and Purposes, and
(iii) conduct research that advances the Objectives and Purposes as well as complements, informs, and builds upon the University‘s existing strengths in the study of capitalism and its ties to prosperity, social progress, and human well-being. (Clemson 2009 MOU, Sec. II)

At Utah State University, the 2008 MOU creates donor funded positions by “augmenting funding for five professors,” called “the Professors.” The university is obligated by the MOU to “ recruit and maintain the Professors in accordance with the Objectives and Purposes” (USU 2008 MOU, Section 2.c.iii):

USU agrees to recruit Professors who support the Objectives and Purposes and have demonstrated advancement of, or show the promise of working effectively in collaborative efforts to advance, the Objectives and Purposes. The Parties expect that the Professors’ research will compliment, inform and build upon USU’s existing strengths in business, finance, economies, institutions and property rights as they relate to and inform the foundations of prosperity, social progress and human well-being. (USU 2008 MOU, Section 3.a)

At the University of Louisville, a 2015 MOU creates a Center for Free Enterprise that involves hiring several faculty. The MOU requires that these faculty be aligned with the Donor invented “Mission” of the Center, but the Donor requires that the search committees for all faculty are to be chaired by the Center’s Director, Professor Stephan Gohmann, who is stipulated by name in the MOU:  

All faculty hires will follow the normal procedures for hiring faculty members in the College and the University. The Center Director will chair all of the search committees for the faculty searches. Faculty members hired for the Center positions must have demonstrated a track record that is supportive of the Center's Mission or show promise of developing such a record. (UL 2015 MOU, Attachment A)

At Western Carolina University, record requests reveal conversations between the BB&T faculty member, Dr. Edward Lopez, surrounding the creation of a the Center for the Study of Free Enterprise. In these conversations, Lopez overtly offers the Charles Koch Foundation early involvement in developing specific hiring objectives. Specifically, Lopez provides insight on how to the hires and program will “create value” for the Koch foundation:

l'll describe the current situation here, in particular the hiring possibilities and my proposed strategy for successfully navigating them. Finally I'll propose an investment scenario and the value it would generate. (Lopez 7/27/15)

Lopez describes his “investment scenario”:

Ideal scenario: Recruit free enterprise individuals for the GL chair and for Steve Miller’s line while also creating a new assistant professor line that Zac Gochenour can compete for. Establish an economics major and expand economics course offerings. Continue to grow our Free Enterprise Educational Activities programs, and develop our pipeline of student development to its fullest potential. (Lopez 7/27/15, Section 3.A)

A February 2015 blog post from a WCU professor reported:

a job posting for a WCU economics professor opening appeared in early October — two months before the free enterprise center would come before the board of trustees for a vote.”  Language in the ad also specified that this person would be part of the center, but that language was later removed from the ad after faculty cried foul). (2016 faculty blog post)

Another WCU professor described how:

Here a tiny, unrepresentative portion of the university faculty has decided on a strategic direction that has major consequences for the university, not in discussions with the rest of the faculty, but with an outside group with a decidedly biased perspective. . . . To my amazement, the administration bought it. That, in my experience, is extraordinary. . . . The university faculty has been left out of the discussions and the Koch Foundation and Dr. Lopez are clearly the beneficiaries of the decisions that have been made. . . . . The process was off the rails. (Smoky Mountain News 1/20/16)
Part of the hiring timeline for WFU Eudaimonia Institute's Associate Director position.

Part of the hiring timeline for WFU Eudaimonia Institute's Associate Director position.

At Wake Forest University, the 2017 Faculty Senate Ad Hoc Committee investigation documented the timeline of hiring events for the Koch funded Eudaimonia Institute. They found that the search for the Associate Director position of the Eudaimonia Institute was posted on a Koch network talent website called TalentMarket.org before being posted by the university.

Talent Market is an organization affiliated the network of think tanks and political non-profits funded by Charles Koch's network of donors. The mission statement for Talent Market reads as follows:

Talent Market’s mission is to promote liberty by providing talent for critical roles within the free-market nonprofit sector. We provide free consulting and recruiting services to free-market think tanks, policy organizations, and research centers dedicated to advancing the principles of limited government and free enterprise. … Talent Market believes that the road to prosperity is paved with freedom and that the success of our movement hinges on the talent that will take us there.

Other language on Talent Market's website that this non-profit search firm is designed to assist “liberty-oriented” organizations in finding “qualified leadership and strategic personnel with expertise necessary to advance free market principles in academia, the media, and public policy.”

As reported by the Center for Media and Democracy, Talent Market has considerable ties to the Koch network, and the donor advised funds they use, DonorsTrust:

Talent Market was founded in 2009 as an “owned entity” of DonorsTrust, a donor advised fund favored by the billionaire Koch Network of ultra-wealthy right-wingers for its easy cloaking of donations to political allies. It is now an LLC attached to Donors Trust.
The Bradley Files credit three people with founding the organization: the former President and CEO of DonorsTrust Whitney Ball, President of the State Policy Network (SPN) Tracie Sharp, and Talent Market Executive Director Claire Kittle Dixon. 
Before founding Talent Market, Dixon was the Program Officer for Leadership and Talent Development at the Charles G. Koch Foundation. The only other employee at Talent Market, talent manager Lauren Skiver, also worked for the Charles G. Koch Foundation as a grants coordinator.

The posting on Talentmarket.org shows that candidates went through Talent Market directly: 

Qualified candidates should submit the following in one PDF file with your name in the file:
  • Résumé
  • Cover letter detailing your philosophical interest in the Eudaimonia Institute and your salary requirements
Materials should be emailed in one PDF document to Claire Dixon, executive director of Talent Market, who is assisting with the search: claire@talentmarket.org. 
While we thank all applicants in advance for their interest in this position, we are only able to contact those to whom we can offer an interview. No phone calls, please.